Tag Archives: Super Broken Games

REVIEW: Super Broken Games

Besides a casual glance at it on the marketplace, my first experience with Super Broken Games ($1.00) came with a tweet from the always-lovely Cathy at Indie Gamer Chick, who could not play the game due to epilepsy concerns with the pulsating menu and in-game effects. After booting up the game for myself, I could understand why, but thankfully developer Feel Good Seal included an option to turn off the effects and issued a patch to fix another potential issue.

With backstory out of the way, Super Broken Games is a series of deliberately-broken minigames, with each based around a particular failed idea or controller caveat. Using varying forms to go about this (sometimes you’re a snake in a maze, other times a bouncing ball, a seemingly-drunken flying ball, etc.), it all amounts to 37 ways to die and / or frustrate yourself.

Granted, a few take the legitimate approach, giving you somewhat normal controls and a straightforward objective (collect all the items, reach the exit), with numerous hazards in place. Challenging, but achievable once you’ve determined the correct path and gotten a handle on whatever controls you’ve been dealt. The vast majority, however, take a more dastardly route, flipping the schemes entirely, or adding a second snake to control, forcing you to watch two screens and babysit two characters, etc.

These minigames revel in playing the jerk, and seem to be there purely to set you off in a rage. So the obvious question would be: Why would anyone want to get pissed off playing a bunch of busted setups? I’m not sure. Maybe you’re a masochist. Or maybe your parents didn’t love you enough and you’re living a transient lifestyle, seeking out painful experiences as a way to feel alive and fill the hole in your heart that never quite healed (…that last bit may be a stretch).

 Super Broken Games - Screen

More than likely, you do it because you appreciate a good dare, which is what most of Super Broken Games feels like. Much as people choose to climb Mt. Everest because ‘it’s there’, so too will gamers play ridiculously-hard or unfair games to prove a point to themselves or others. ‘Others’ might end up being the key word, as the game allows for local multiplayer up to four. Turning ‘constant failure’ into a party game sure beats going solo.

Ultimately though, the novelty of being ‘broken’ may not be enoughSuper Broken Games opts for a playful sort of fun with its controls, but it lacks the artistry and addictive qualities of other masochist titles like Super Meat Boy or N+. Mean is always mean, but being mean on purpose? That’s just mean.