REVIEW: Twenty Twelve

December 21, 2012 has a large portion of the planet on edge, what with doomsday cults predicting all manner of plagues, magnetic pole reversals, certain elements of my family wishing to arm themselves and go renegade (sadly true), the list goes on. I for one think it’s a bit of an overreaction. Then again, I know exactly where I’ll be on the big day; hundreds of feet below the Earth, reflecting on subterranean living in my luxury apartment, watching the John Cusack movie and smiling like a man that’s just dodged a Mayan bullet. That’s my thing. I’m sure everything’ll be fine for the rest of you, though. Bring a towel and don’t panic.

Twenty Twelve (80 MSP) and Sugar Pill Studios aren’t taking any chances, however, getting their game out well before the apocalypse, to properly enjoy the success now and tell us all they told us so later. The game finds Mayan debunker Serena Silva (think Dora the Explorer for XBLIG) hot on the trail of yet another Mayan temple to disprove, her progress slowed by the nefarious Dolores (not the usual name you think of for a villain) and her robotic creations.

That premise makes way for the game’s moveable puzzle pieces. The Mayans apparently built charmed trash cans (read: stone spirits) before the world snuffed them out, ingenious group that they were, even though they failed to share that secret as well. Called tun-ways by the game, these little guys respond only to certain rings and outfits (peacock feathers?) that Serena finds while exploring.

Each room in the game is a puzzle onto itself, with various tun-way (good and bad) presenting themselves as ‘keys’ to unlocking the next door. This can be as simple as having them pull a lever or hitting a floor switch in sequence, or, with later models, jumping gaps, chasing down evil tun-way like dogs, and severing floors to create entirely new paths. While there’s just one solution to each room, the getting there is fun and does allow for some improvisation.

Stopping at that, this would have been an easy title to push. All is not well in Twenty Twelve, though. For the most part, advancement is linear and a non-issue. This is a puzzler. Once you collect a powerup that controls a different color of tun-way, though, the game abandons its linearity, leaving it up to you to find the next set of puzzle rooms. Even with a sort of ‘central hub’ and plaques by each door cluing you in, the game should have opted for more deliberate text or indicators.

And a word to the wise; if you do find yourself lost and / or backtracking, careful with the ‘skip room’ feature. This caused a few Code 4s for me, including one right near the end that permanently barricaded the exits, unable to skip or retrace steps due to the auto-save.

You’d think having the power to control stone creatures would come with a cooler outfit.

Ultimately I’m still recommending Twenty Twelve, despite my time with it being a mixed bag. On the one side, excellent puzzles with interesting, proactive solutions, and adorable tun-ways doing my bidding. A strong showing. Then the opposite; vague explanations, confusing stage progression, and game-killing glitches that I know others won’t be as quick to forgive.

The Code 4s I experienced (six in all) may have been headaches, but weren’t catastrophic to my fun. The glitch that locked away the ending and potential Mayan Truth from me? A bit more severe. The developer has been kind enough to look into the issue, but I’m not starting over. Looks like I’m waiting for Decemeber 21st with the rest of you.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “REVIEW: Twenty Twelve”

    1. I did cry myself to sleep the past few nights. To have that many Code 4s, an ending glitch, and more, and -still- recommend the game, I need to mark this down somewhere: Most. Lenient. Review. Ever. I quite enjoyed the puzzle-solving though.

The Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s